John F. Kennedy takes oath as US president

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John F. Kennedy’s presidency begins with his inauguration at the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C; the oath of office is administered by Chief Justice Earl Warren on January 20, 1961. President Kennedy delivers a widely praised inaugural address, asking Americans to “ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country” and for the people of the world to “ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man”. He is congratulated by Soviet premier Nikita Khrushchev. Kennedy also formally nominates his cabinet and attends the inaugural balls.
John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917 – November 22, 1963) was an American politician who served as the 35th president of the United States from January 1961 until his assassination in November 1963. Kennedy served at the height of the Cold War, and the majority of his work as president concerned relations with the Soviet Union and Cuba. A Democrat, Kennedy represented Massachusetts in the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate prior to becoming president. Kennedy was born into a wealthy, political family in Brookline, Massachusetts. He graduated from Harvard University in 1940, before joining the U.S. Naval Reserve the following year. During World War II, he commanded a series of PT boats in the Pacific theater and earned the Navy and Marine Corps Medal for his service. After the war, Kennedy represented the 11th congressional district of Massachusetts in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1947 to 1953. Kennedy’s administration included high tensions with communist states in the Cold War. He increased the number of American military advisers in South Vietnam.

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