Indian National Security Strategy

The national security policy of India is too idealistic as it aspires to be global power without considering the fact that its human security has been a denied domain of national security.

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Since independence (1947), the Indian national security strategy has not been defined. It has always been a major policy goal and challenge for all the successive governments to frame the national security strategy. NSS was drafted once in 2007 but was not approved by the cabinet committee of security. By the central government of India a defense planning committee was created in 2018 having several mandates and including the preparation of the draft of national security strategy. In 2019 Indian national congress came out with “India’s national security strategy” which also called the Hooda report and further it was integrated into its manifesto.

India being one-sixth of the total world aspires to become the global power with its hegemonic design. It has unsettled issues in the north with China and in the north west with Pakistan on Kashmir Dispute, which is bone of contention since 1947 and have further blow up the situation after revoking article 35A and article 370.

Within this shifting global landscape, India has the opportunity to put in place a new framework for its own security, growth and development, and that of developing countries around the world. As a rising global power, this must be India’s principle endeavor in the coming decades.

Having the dream to become global power all the successive governments of India has always kept a very hard stance against the neighborhood especially against China and Pakistan. While giving the projection of secularism to the world they have always followed the Hindutwa perspective truly. Like the current PM Modi is one of those individuals who has the blood of many Muslims on their hands in the Indian territory while following the Hindutwa narrative.

Under the garb of net security provider to the west India is getting conventionally strong and to counter-weight the China, in result regional balance of power is changing. This is leading to the arms race in the region at the cost of human security. China, Pakistan and India being the nuclear powers may initiate the conventional war and which can lead to the nuclear conflict.

India has declared no first use of nuclear weapons, except in response to biological or chemical weapons. Lavoy and Smith discuss three plausible scenarios for a nuclear war between India and Pakistan. India has conventional military superiority. India is also geographically much larger than Pakistan. One possible route to nuclear war involves a conventional conflict between India and Pakistan. If Pakistan perceived that India were about to successfully invade them, that would put pressure on Pakistan to launch its nuclear weapons before they were overrun by the superior conventional Indian forces. Another possibility for starting a nuclear conflict is that India or Pakistan could lose control of its command and control structures due to an attack on them by the other side or possibly an attack by terrorists from within India or Pakistan or from another country. In such a scenario, it is not clear who might be in control of the nuclear forces and what steps they might take. A third possibility for starting a nuclear conflict is that India or Pakistan might mistake an attack by conventional forces, or even military exercises, for an attack by nuclear forces.

While getting conventionally stronger gradually in the region Indian conventional armed forces have shifted the strategy to offensive defensive against the adversaries, which speaks out its aggression and security dilemma and also creating the imbalance in the region at the cost of human security. Media must be rational and independent but in Indian state it’s never been like that due to political influence. Its media projects the wrong perception not only in front of other world rather also its own people, especially against Pakistan.

In a nutshell, the national security policy of India is too idealistic as it aspires to be global power without considering the fact that its human security has been a denied domain of national security. Besides the political marginalization and exclusion of the minorities has threatened the social cohesion of the Indian society. Above all to diverted attention from the internal flaws they have created a perception of external threat from China and India hence putting the region in arms race. In addition to that they have vague nuclear policy in which on one they propagate that they don’t believe in first use, on the other hand they are developing nuclear capabilities. Furthermore, the best part of the Indian strategy is the effective use of soft power and media.

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